Physical Health

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Am I at risk of having a heart attack?
Heart disease occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrower - the result is often a heart attack. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Some risk factors are beyond your control, but most can be modified or controlled, through behavior or medications, to help lower your risk of a heart attack (even repeat heart attacks). These risk factors multiply each other's effects, so it is very important to prevent or control all controllable risk factors. If you still need more incentive to control the risk factors, high cholesterol and smoking can predict two-thirds of all heart attack victims. Take this quick assessment to learn the risk factors for a heart attack and help you determine if you should make some lifestyle changes to reduce your own heart attack risk.
 
Slow Heart Attack

Have I had a heart attack but didn't recognize it?
No one doubts a heart attack is happening when it is sudden and intense. But most heart attacks begin slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Most people do not recognize a slow heart attack, happening to themselves or someone else, and wait too long to get help. By knowing and recognizing the symptoms of a slow heart attack, you could prevent someone from having a massive, sudden heart attack. Almost all heart attack victims experience chest pain or discomfort. And both men and women may have some of the other symptoms, but women are more likely to experience other symptoms along with the chest discomfort. If you or someone with you has chest discomfort that lasts several minutes, or has chest discomfort with one or more of the other heart attack signs, call 9-1-1 and get to a hospital immediately. Nearly 1.1 million Americans have a heart attack each year and nearly half of those are fatal. Half of these deaths occur within 1 hour of the start of symptoms and before the person reaches the hospital. Take this quick assessment to learn the symptoms of a slow heart attack and help you determine if you or someone you care about has had a slow heart attack that may lead to a sudden heart attack.
 
Risk for Stroke


Am I at risk for a stroke?
A stroke occurs when the arteries to the brain become blocked or rupture, cutting off the blood supply to the brain and causing brain tissue to die. Strokes are the third leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability in the U.S. Are you at risk for a stroke? Everyone has some risk of having a stroke. Some stroke risk factors are beyond your control, while others are preventable or can be controlled. Take this quick assessment to learn more about the risk factors for stroke, and help you determine if there are lifestyle changes you can make to lower your risk of stroke.
 
Early Stroke Symptoms

Are these symptoms the early warning signs of a stroke?
A stroke occurs when the arteries to the brain become blocked or rupture, cutting off the blood supply to the brain and causing brain tissue to die. Strokes are the third leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability in the U.S. There are 2 types of strokes: ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic strokes occur when a blood vessel is blocked by a blood clot or fatty deposit. About 80% of all strokes are ischemic. Most often with ischemic strokes the greatest loss of function is immediate, but 15-20% of ischemic strokes are progressive, where most loss of function occurs over the day or 2 following the stroke. A special kind of ischemic stroke if called a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) or 'mini-stroke'. TIA symptoms usually last less than 15 minutes and treatment is often ignored because there is no noticeable damage. TIAs are serious and you should get treatment even if there is no obvious stroke damage since about one-third of TIA victims have a more serious stroke in the near future. About 20% of stroke victims have a hemorrhagic stroke, where a blood vessel to the brain ruptures. Hemorrhagic strokes are the most serious type of stroke with loss of function normally occurring within minutes to hours. Getting treatment within 3 hours of the first signs of stroke can help stop the brain damamge and resulting disability. A stroke is a medical emergency. Recognizing the early symptoms, and knowing what to do, could save a life! Call 9-1-1 immediately if you see a potential stroke vicitm. Every second counts! Take this quick assessment to learn more about the early warning signs and symptoms of stroke, and help you determine if you or someone you know may have suffered a stroke. You may need this knowledge to save a life, including your own, someday.
 
Diabetes (Type 2) Risk

Am I at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes?
90% - 95% of people diagnosed with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes, and 90% of those people are overweight. Type 2 diabetes affects the body's ability to use the insulin it produces. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be reversed with weight loss, a healthy diet, and exercise. Take this quick assessment to learn the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and help you determine your own risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.
 
Diabetes

Do I have a symptoms of diabetes?
A person with diabetes has too much glucose (sugar) in the blood and not enough in the body's cells. The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are similar. With Type 1 diabetes, the body stops producing insulin, creating high glucose levels, because the insulin producing cells have been destroyed. In Type 2 diabetes, the body's cells become resistant to the insulin that is being produced. Either way, your body sends out warning signs or symptoms to let you know your cells aren't getting the glucose they need. Parents often 'overdiagnose' diabetes in their children. Just drinking a lot or dry, itchy skin alone is not a strong indicator of diabetes, but when combined with other diabetes symptoms may be cause for concern. Take this quick assessment to learn the symptoms of diabetes and help you determine if you or your child may have diabetes.
 
Seasonal Allergies

Do I have seasonal allergies?
Spring allergies are the most common as trees, flowers, and weeds grow and pollenating bees are busy. Fall is the second common allergy season, with different plants blooming and molds are more active. People who are allergic to the spring and fall pollens also tend to be sensitive to indoor irritants like dust mites, animal dander, and molds, often leading to year-round allergy symptoms. Take this quick assessment to learn the signs of seasonal allergies and help you determine if you or your child suffers from seasonal allergies.
 
Food Allergy

Am I allergic to certain foods?
About 1.5% of adults and up to 6% of children under age 3 in the U.S. (or about 4 million people) have a true food allergy. It usually isn't a 'new' food that causes an allergic reaction. People often develop an allergy to a food he/she has eaten many times. The most common food allergies in children are eggs, milk, peanuts, soy and wheat. Children typically outgrow their allergies to milk, eggs, soy, and wheat. Children usually will not outgrow allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, fish, or shrimp. The most common foods to cause allergies in adults are shrimp, lobster, crab and other shellfish, peanuts, walnuts, and other tree nuts, fish, and eggs. Unlike children, adults do not usually 'outgrow' or lose their food allergies. Take this quick assessment to learn the signs of food allergies and help you determine if you or your child is allergic to certain foods.
 
Cold or Flu

Do I have a simple cold or the flu?
Do you have a simple cold or the flu? Why does it matter when you still feel so rotten? There are treatments for the flu that may help you get better faster. Also, if you have the flu, you have probably exposed other people and they will appreciate it if you warn them so they can take preventative medicine and avoid getting sick too. (As bad as they feel for you, they don't want to be sick with you!) Take this quick assessment to learn the signs of flu and help you determine if you or your child has the flu or just a cold.
 
Early Pregnancy

Could I be pregnant?
Wondering if you're pregnant? The symptoms of pregnancy are not the same for every woman. In fact, your own symptoms may be different from one pregnancy to another. Pregnancy symptoms can also vary in their intensity, frequency and duration. Many of the earliest pregnancy symptoms are very similar to routine pre-menstrual discomforts. The symptoms in this assessment are in no particular order, but answer these few questions to learn more about what to expect very early during pregnancy and help you determine if you may be pregnant.
 
Gestational Diabetes Risk

Am I at risk of developing gestational diabetes?
Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of pregnant women, when the hormones from the placenta make the mother insulin resistant. Prenatal care is especially important for women with gestational diabetes risk factors. Good control of diabetes during pregnancy ensures the well being of mother and baby. Gestational diabetes can usually be controlled with a balanced, healthy diet, exercise, and insulin when needed. Many women who have gestational diabetes also develop Type 2 diabetes years later and babies born to a mother with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing diabetes later in life. Take this quick assessment to learn the risk factors for gestational diabetes and help you determine your own risk of developing gestational diabetes.
 

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